Hunting Wild Honey Bees with Tom Seeley

We’ve heard a lot about the decline of managed honey bees lately, but not so much about honey bees living in the wild. That is until now. Dr. Thomas D. Seeley, Horace White professor of Biology at Cornell University and a leader in the field of honey bee biology, has written a new book Following the Wild Bees: The Craft and Science of Bee Hunting. This slim volume focuses on techniques for locating unmanaged honey bee colonies nesting in natural settings or even in urban areas.

Honey bee hunting is an ancient craft, used by people centuries ago to find honey bees to rob of their honey. Now it can be an entertaining and engaging hobby that requires little more than patience and a willingness to learn more about nature.

As Seeley explains in detail, finding a colony of wild honey bees involves capturing foraging bees using a specially-designed box and feeding the trapped honey bees scented sugar solution. Once released, the honey bees return to their nest and recruit more foragers. The bee hunter marks the returning bees and then follows to see where they are going.

Although beautifully written and engaging, I do have qualms about some of the contents of the book. First of all, the bees are fed in an old piece of honeycomb. The idea is that the comb entices the the honey bees to return to the food. This is a good technique in the hands of a careful scientist who realizes the need to use clean, healthy comb. I am concerned, however, that those who aren’t as careful or knowledgeable may expose wild bees to diseases and parasites by using contaminated honeycomb from sick bee colonies.

The second concern I had was that not everyone reading the book will be as respectful of nature as Thomas Seeley. I learned the hard way that people wanting to know how to build leafcutter bee nests don’t always have positive motives. I heard from gardeners who wanted to build the nests not to help the leafcutter bees, but to trap and destroy them. Honey bee hunting may result in similar harm if wild honey bee nests are destroyed for the honey or to capture healthy bees for managed hives. If you read the book, I would like the hear your thoughts about this.

On completely different note, if you are wondering whether to purchase an electronic version or the paper version, I have to say that the acid-free paper used to make this book is exceptional. I don’t usually wax poetic about paper quality, but when I opened this book, I spent several minutes running my fingers over the pages. Enough said.

Following the Wild Bees: The Craft and Science of Bee Hunting is a must for anyone who wants to study wild honey bees. It will likely to appeal to beekeepers and scientists alike. Ideally it will be used to introduce some lucky youngsters to ways of observing our natural world, as well.

Related:

Visit Princeton University Press for a chapter to preview

ScienceFriday has a combined interview with Bernd Heinrich and Tom Seeley talking about their newest books (with short videos of using the bee box and marking bees)

Hardcover: 184 pages
Publisher: Princeton University Press (May 3, 2016)
ISBN-10: 0691170266
ISBN-13: 978-0691170268

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Disclosures:  This book was provided by the publisher for review purposes. I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

A Sting in the Tale

Our next book about bees, A Sting in the Tale: My Adventures with Bumblebees by Dave Goulson, is an enjoyable combination of memoir and natural history discourse. It came out in paperback last spring,

The author is a British biologist and conservationist who works at the University of Sussex, where he specializes in the ecology of bumblebees. He is an excellent storyteller, mixing humor, adventure, and insightful observations into a highly-readable stew.

I was particularly taken with his team’s use of sniffer dogs to try to locate wild bumble bee nests, which can be quite elusive and hard to study. In an interesting twist, the dog handler became more adept at finding nests than the dog, which led to questions about how the odors of different bumble bee nests may vary.

The text features quotes from a variety of sources, including  Mary Kay Ash, Charles Darwin and Monty Python. The most memorable, however, is Goulson’s own:

“We have barely begun to understand the complexity of interactions between living creatures on earth, yet we often choose to squander the irreplaceable, to discard those things that both keep us alive and make life worth living. Perhaps if we learn to save a bee today we can save the world tomorrow?” ~ Dave Goulson, page 241

 

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If you are curious about what bumble bees have to do with red clover in New Zealand, tomatoes grown in greenhouses in Spain, and sniffer dogs, then A Sting in the Tale is a perfect book for you.

Paperback: 288 pages
Publisher: Picador; Reprint edition (April 28, 2015)
ISBN-10: 125007097X
ISBN-13: 978-1250070975

See the Books About Bees tag for more reviews.

 

Bee Books

Disclosures: This book was supplied by my local library. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at not extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

The Bees in Your Backyard

Have you ever wondered about what kind of bee it was that you saw in a wildflower or photographed last week? The newly-published book, The Bees in Your Backyard: A Guide to North America’s Bees by Joseph S. Wilson and Olivia J. Messinger Carril, will help you discover and identify the diversity of bees around you.

 

The first chapter is an introduction to bees for the general public, including what bees are, what they eat, a description of bee life cycles, etc. Chapter two has complete details about how to attract and promote bees in your community.  Included are instructions for making bee blocks, bumble bee nests, and plant lists for bee gardens in different regions.

The main contents, or “meat,” of the book are six chapters, each of which is devoted to a family of bees:

  • Andrenidae
  • Colletidae
  • Melittidae
  • Halictidae
  • Megachilidae
  • Apidae

 

These chapters feature identification tips and discussions of the common subfamilies, genera and some species belonging to that family. Sidebars reveal size distributions and range maps of the bees in a particular group. The discussions of the unique features and biology of the various genera and species make for fascinating reading.

To be clear, this is not a pocket field guide that you would carry with you in a backpack. At 8″ by 10″ and 288 pages, it is a weighty tome. It features over 900 color photographs and is an excellent desk reference.

 

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If you have ever asked, “what kind of bee is that?” The Bees in Your Backyard is the book for you. It is a must have for bee lovers of all stripes.

Paperback: 288 pages
Publisher: Princeton University Press (November 24, 2015)
ISBN-10: 0691160775
ISBN-13: 978-0691160771

See the Books About Bees tag for more reviews.

 

Bee Books

Disclosures: This book was supplied by the publisher for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at not extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.