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Do you blog about ants? Know someone else who does? Have a favorite ant-related blog you follow? Please let me know the details or add links in the comments below.

I'm going to be working on a guide to ant blogs over the next week. It will be published on another blog, and the links will be added to the list of websites, forums and blogs page here.

Also, if you are an ant researcher and have some interesting news to share any time throughout the year, let me know and I'll pass it on to our facebook page.

Thank you!

National Pollinator Week 2018 starts today.

Let's start the celebration by taking a look at a new book, Butterfly Gardening: The North American Butterfly Association Guide by Jane Hurwitz.

Why feature butterfly gardening on an ant blog? Butterfly gardening encourages the use of native plants, which supply flowers that are used by many different pollinators as well as butterflies. The leaves and seeds are food for caterpillars, plus other insects that support food webs. Butterfly gardening is win-win!

As for the book, the first part features basic information about common garden butterflies, their life cycles, and their needs. Range maps are included so you can find out which species of butterflies to expect in your area and what some of their common caterpillar food plants are.

Because the recommended species of butterfly garden plants vary depending on where you live, in Part II members of the North American Butterfly Association suggest flowering plants and trees specific to regions around the United States, from the Florida to Portland, Oregon.

Overall, the book is illustrated with gorgeous, captivating photographs. It is also packed with tried-and-true practical information from experienced butterfly experts.

Butterfly Gardening: The North American Butterfly Association Guide is a fantastic resource. Be inspired by a copy today.

Check out some previous posts on the same topic:

Do you have any suggestions for plants that are good for pollinators and/or ants?

Flexibound: 288 pages
Publisher: Princeton University Press; Flexibound edition (April 10, 2018)
ISBN-10: 0691170347
ISBN-13: 978-0691170343

Disclosure: This book was provided by the publisher's representative for review purposes. Also, I am an affiliate with Amazon so I can provide you with cover images and links to more information about books and products. As you probably are aware, if you click through the highlighted title link and purchase a product, I will receive a very small commission, at no extra cost to you. Any proceeds help defray the costs of hosting and maintaining this website.

Let's take a look at a few more images my husband brought back from Malaysia.

In this video he found an ant running on his hand. Because he was struggling to focus, he passed the ant to a colleague (I edited out the shots of his feet).

If you got seasick viewing that, here's a screenshot:

When I saw his video I squirmed a bit. If an ant is as thin and wasp-like as this one is, I'm pretty sure it can sting.

Is it a Tetraponera? Am I right that they were being a bit foolhardy to handle it?

These would have been less of a problem:

The running insects in the video are processional termites. You can see some of the workers carrying what are probably clumps of lichen in their mandibles. Cool insects.

He definitely doesn't get to go without me next time.